Archive for the ‘Flashing’ Category

During this home inspection we noticed a few water stains on the 1st floor, then directly above on the 2nd floor and yes, then on the 3rd floor which turned out to be directly below the chimney.

This is a water front property and it was impossible to get a ladder up 4 stories and our drone is not flying. This is what we found in the attic.

rimg0585

F.Y.I. Using silicone in the attic to stop water leaks does not work! I am not sure what this handyman was thinking.

 

 

We found these problems with this chimney during a recent home inspection.

ChimneyFlashingDiagram IMGP8684

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The base flashing had been removed and someone painted on roofing cement in an ill attempt to stop water leaks. From the ground these repairs looked a little off, but nothing very alarming. My home inspector antennae went up just enough to make sure I got a closer look. These repairs have been leaking for sometime and there is an unknown amount of wood rot surrounding the chimney in the attic.

 

The chimney cap mortar has completely disintegrated and was falling off the chimney while we were there. Rain had been getting inside and causing even more problems. Upon closer examination, we found a crack at the outside of the chimney which carried through to the clay liner inside. This is certainly a fire and safety hazard!

IMGP8685 IMGP8687

 

 

 

 

 

 

The buyers are certainly glad we climbed the roof and found these dangerous and very costly problems during our home inspection.

 

 

I have written about the amount of hours by approved vendors that is needed to stay up to date and in good standards with both ASHI.org and the states requirements for both Florida and Alabama.

As of a few days ago Inspection World 2015 ended a week long session of educational training classes in Philadelphia, PA. I am told there were nearly 600 home inspectors attending the available classes!

Through ASHI.org inspectors can get several on-line hours throughout the year plus a web site  forum for inspectors to ask other inspectors questions and get some of the latest information on different ways to perform inspections.

Let’s not forget all the “Tools” required. My wife thinks I have enough tools (toys) already, but…..there is always something new.

I have started looking into Drones for use on some of the high roof tops I can’t reach with a standard ladder. Currently there are some restrictions due to FAA regulations. I will keep looking into it and hope to pioneer this field.

Here is just one of many samples I found on the internet

drone

.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QU51Ib3DBfU

Yes, more fire safety talk. It seems everywhere I turn lately there is more convincing evidence that most of our current smoke & carbon monoxide detectors are not as safe as we would like to think. I’m talking about Ionization type. A few quick Google searches and a newer type called “Photoelectric” will keep popping up.

Both types can and do alert us, but there are some big differences. Below are some samples of what I have come to learn recently along with some interesting quotes.

Will combination units be the next best thing?!

“A smoke detector that sounds approximately nineteen minutes after smoke reached its sensing chamber is like an airbag that does not deploy until nineteen minutes after
a car accident.”

- Judge David E. Schoenthaler, Mercer v. Pitway/BRK Brands (First Alert)

Among the objectives of a smoke characterization study conducted by UL in 2007 were to develop recommendations to UL 217 and allow for the development of new smoke-sensing technologies. As a result of UL’s project, the following was identified for future consideration: “Requiring the use of combination ionization and photoelectric alarms for residential use in order to maximize responsiveness to a broad range of fires.”

The reason for this recommendation was that “Some of the evaluated flaming and non-flaming test scenarios triggered one but not both photo and ion alarms within the alarm response time criteria specified in UL 217.”

Ionization alarms are notorious for nuisance tripping. They frequently go off when you cook, burn toast, shower, etc. When alarms nuisance trip, people become frustrated and intentionally disable them. Most of us, including myself have removed a battery or pulled a unit off the wall intending to “fix it tomorrow”

In summary…I am heading to my local Big Box store to look at some combination units, I think you should do the same

Flashing not properly installed has caused water damages behind the wall from the 2nd floor to the bottom of the home (ground level)