Archive for the ‘New Home Inspection’ Category

Kevin did this home inspection on a brand new home in the Foley, AL area. While traversing the attic he found this damaged structural framing member a.k.a. a Truss

Damaged truss new home

You can clearly see the break in the truss and someone attempted to fix it with 2 nails, then bent the nails over to hold it together.

All repairs to engineered lumber must have a letter or engineering stamp indicating that the repair has been approved.

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And, what is engineered wood flooring?  I Googled up “Engineered flooring” and got About 30,900,000 results (0.98 seconds)

Technically, engineered wood is any wood product that is not solid wood. Producers of wood panel products like to call plywood the first engineered product. Plywood consists of thin veneers of wood that are stacked so that the grain of one layer, or ply, runs perpendicular to the plies above and below it. An adhesive is applied between the plies and they’re bonded together on a hot press.

engineered-wood-sheathing

It is nearly impossible for a home inspector to know how many layers of laminate flooring are involved or how many times it can sanded (if any). Sometimes we might find a left over piece of flooring somewhere on site. If we are really lucky there might be a box of it sitting around. Then, you can do some research to find out general care instructions.

 

 

After a rainstorm look for water puddling near your foundation.  If there are puddles you need to re-grade, install a moisture barrier, french drain, cut a swale, gutters, etc.

Ideally water will drain 3″+ away from the foundation of your home

I recently had a Realtor inquire about our services. Among this inquiry was one easy answer, but one some people seem to struggle with. She wanted my opinion as to the “Home Inspectors Role” in a Real estate sale.

Our responsibility is to provide the client with a complete and thorough inspection and report. The report should be an unbias report and assessment of the property at the time of the inspection. The inspection & report should be informative, easy to read and understand. We do our best to put items that are defective, unsafe or no longer working as intended on the summary page. We do not offer a pass or fail grade to a home inspection report

I inspected this home a few days ago in Gulf Shores, AL. Someone has removed the hard wired smoke detectors. Also, there has never been any carbon monoxide detectors installed. There is gas in the home and they certainly need to be updated

The other day I arrived at an inspection to find the water meter had been removed. Though this is nothing new lately, it is impossible to perform a full inspection without water. The selling Realtor thought the water was on (whoops)

So, I revisited a few days later after the new meter is installed. I turned it on at the street and there was plenty of water running inside. After 5 or so minutes I started loosing water pressure inside. I looked outside toward the water meter and saw water gurgling up through the ground.

Another good reason to make sure all utilities are on prior to the inspection.

Some things I can write-up on an inspection before I even get to the property. Among those items is the electrical wire for the water heaters. It is seldom installed in a conduit for protection. Many of these heater locations are in the garage and laundry rooms where all kinds of clothing, tools and miscellaneous items are hanging off from this exposed wire.

This picture is one from today on a brand new home.

So, if your wire at the water heater or elsewhere is exposed to human peril, please put it into a conduit for your protection.