Archive for the ‘Appliances’ Category

With the cold winter Holidays here, brings a time for celebration, and that means more cooking, home decorating, entertaining, and an increased risk of fire and accidents.

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You probably remember the movie “Christmas Vacation” Every home inspector and firefighter will tell you not to let your lights, plugs and outlets look like theirs did!

Please be safe

Merry Christmas

 

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Lots of savings are available when making our homes more energy efficient.

The Department of Energy has lots of ideas and programs available. Some coming soon will include lower interest rates when purchasing efficient homes and you may even qualify for higher amounts of loans if a home meets certain requirements.

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Our homes are a major source of energy use in the U.S. Improving the efficiency of new and existing homes while educating consumers about their energy use will help consumers save money and increase the nation’s energy security.

The Energy Department supports research and development on innovative technologies that save energy and money while also working with local governments, utilities and nonprofits to provide opportunities for families to make smart, cost-effective energy upgrades to their homes. From basic information on water heaters and insulation to home energy audits and appliances, the Department’s Energy Saver website provides consumers with practical tips and advice on ways to cut their energy use.

For more information go to http://www.energy.gov/public-services/homes

 

I just finished an inspection that the client didn’t want, at first. Her lending institution told her she needed one to get a loan. (That’s another story) During the course of the inspection things went very well. The house was 30 plus years old and had recently been rehabbed by someone local.

When I got to the heating and cooling I found an item which costs only a few dollars and it was incorrectly installed which could cost someone their life. I found that someone used a clothes dryer vent pipe for a gas flu vent type “b” vent. Needless to say, this won’t work, the back side of the vent was cooked with a large hole in it. Carbon monoxide had been pouring into the house while doing this home inspection until I found this safety issue.

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I immediately turned the heater off and asked the clients and their young kids to go outside and get some fresh air. Fortunately they had not been there but a very short time and fresh air is all they needed and they refused medical treatment. I do carry a small medical bag with me and checked my SPO2 levels which were fine.

Lots of lessons to be learned here. Above all else, GET A HOME INSPECTION!

This may be a little unorthodox for most, but we do live in a country full of inventive people. I kind of think of this as a Redneck Bidet.

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Are you wondering how that cold water feels!

Newer building dictates that there is a catch pan under the water heater if a leak will damage the interior materials and belongings.

I believe these folks misunderstood and inserted the can under the pipe over the water heater

Maybe they were getting ready to make an MRE (Meal Ready to Eat) and just needed to add some hot water?

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You don’t have to be a Home Inspector to think something might be wrong with this sink drain. Just in case, there is a huge bottle of “Drain O” of some sort under the sink.

These corrugated pipes are becoming popular here. It seems to me it is a great way to create bacteria and other health problems as it can’t drain completely.

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Below is an example what a proper sink drain should look like.

 

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Very often I am asked how much longer will these appliance last. There are so many variables that I can’t accurately answer the question. Though NAHB (National Association of Home Builders) offers some guidelines and since I see so many different aged units I can often give some guidance.
“Appliances

The life expectancy of a typical appliance depends to a great extent on the use it receives. Moreover, appliances are often replaced long before they are worn out because changes in styling, technology and consumer preferences make newer products more desirable. Of the major appliances in a home, gas ranges have the longest life expectancy: 15 years. Dryers and refrigerators last about 13 years. Some of the appliances with the shortest lifespan are: compactors (6 years), dishwashers (9 years) and microwave ovens (9 years)” and water heaters 5-15 years